Current Issue : [International Journal of Physiotherapy 2018; 5(3) : 87-131] RSS

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ABSTRACT

Background: Methods: Results: Conclusion: Keywords:


Ondrej Prouza, Efthimios Kouloulas, Dragana Zarkovic

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173931

Pages : 87-91

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Level of spasticity in post-stroke patients allows for the predictability of the patient’s level of recovery. The study aimed to assess the anti-spastic effect of high-intensity electromagnetic field stimulation in post-stroke condition.

Methods:

30 post-stroke patients, randomized into two groups participated. The treatment group (TG) was delivered ten therapies to spastic muscles with high-intensity electromagnetic stimulation. The control group (CG) was delivered ten electrotherapy sessions in the spastic muscle area combined with kinesiotherapy. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used as a primary outcome measure to evaluate the level of spasticity. Secondary outcome measure, Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) was used to evaluate the patient’s quality of life. Results were obtained pre-treatment, post-treatment and after 1-month follow-up was completed.

Results:

During the 1-month follow-up, TG improved results up to 66% decreasing spasticity from 2.33±0.90 in the beginning to 0.87±0.64 points on the MAS. The CG, during the 1-month follow-up, improved up to 31% decreasing spasticity from 2.13±0.74 in the beginning to 1.47±0.74 points on the MAS. According to Barthel Index, 81% level of improvement was observed in TG during 1-month follow-up vs. 72% level of improvement observed for the CG in a 1-month follow-up.

Conclusion:

The evaluation showed greater spasticity reduction in TG - 66% vs. 31% in the CG after the 1-month follow-up visit. Results suggest that high-intensity electromagnetic stimulation is an effective extracorporeal physical modality for spasticity management in post-stroke patients.

Keywords:

spasticity, stroke, high-intensity electromagnetic field stimulation, Super Inductive System.


Mehmet Yıldız

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173932

Pages : 92-97

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Football training reduces the flexibility of players. Lower flexibility in the knee and hip flexors may increase the risk of muscle strain injury. A method which increases the flexibility without a concomitant deficit in muscle performance will be meaningful for athletic performance and injury prevention for football players. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the acute effects of self-myofascial release via a foam roller on vertical jumps, speed, agility and flexibility of football players.

Methods:

It was a randomized, nonexperimental and comparative design. Participants were forty-two amateur football players (age: 24.3 ± 5.5 yr., height: 175.24± 4.3 cm, weight 69.03± 5.56 kg). They were divided randomly into four groups as control (CON), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS) and foam roller (FR). The CON performed five minutes jogging and seven and a half minute rest, the SS performed five minutes jogging and seven and a half minutes of static stretching, the DS performed five minutes jogging, and seven and a half minutes dynamic stretching, and the FRG performed five minutes jogging and seven and a half minutes foam roller intervention. Outcome measurements: After the stretching protocols, all groups performed vertical jumps (countermovement jump, squat jump, and horizontal jump), speed (10 and 30 m.), and agility (t-test) tests. One way ANOVA test was used for comparing results of the groups.

Results:

The FR and DS protocols were significantly better in speed, agility, and vertical jumps test when compared with the SS (P<0.01). Moreover, the FR and SS had significantly better flexibility than the DS and CON (P<0.01).

Conclusion:

According to the results of the present study, the acute effect of foam roller intervention is more appropriate for improving flexibility without a concomitant deficit in muscle performance than static and dynamic stretching protocols.

Keywords:

self-myofascial release, foam roller, flexibility, anaerobic performance


Mazen Mushabab Alqahtani, Mahamed Ateef, Shady Alshewaier, Ahmed Mansour Almansour, Ahmad Alanazi, Sultan Ayyadah Alanazi, Naif Ziyad Alrashdi, Radhakrishnan Unnikrishnan, Wafaa AlRubaia, Savita Singh

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173933

Pages : 98-104

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Several studies have evaluated the effects of knee osteoarthritis on general and specific activities of the population using various health-related questionnaires in their original/native form, but very few have reported in Saudi Arabian population using Arabic versions. The target of the study is to observe the degree of knee difficulties during pivoting, kneeling and squatting in bilateral knee osteoarthritis male patients using disease-specific Arabic Version Knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score physical function (KOOS-PS) short form questionnaire in Saudi Arabian population.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study exploring 109 male primary bilateral knee osteoarthritis patients in Saudi Arabia. Subjects were assigned to three different groups based on their age after meeting the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Demographic data were obtained, and subjects were asked to rate their degree of knee difficulty during pivoting, kneeling and squatting activities using the disease-specific Arabic short-form questionnaire.

Results:

The statistical description introduced in the mean, standard deviation, median, 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The statistical parameters such as mean and standard deviations were 84.08±8.81, 76.58±11.49, 28.05 ± 8.4 in the three age groups such as 50-60, 61 to 70 and above 70 years old along with 95% confidence intervals 78.2-84, 72.6-80.47, and 25.17-30.94 respectively. The statistical significance found between 50-60years and above 70years p < 0.001, 61-70years and above 70years p < 0.001 but statistical insignificance found between 50-60years and 61-70years age groups p < 0.14.

Conclusion:

High degree of knee difficulty has been observed in male bilateral knee osteoarthritis during pivoting, kneeling and squatting activities among 61-70years and above 70years of age groups.

Keywords:

Self-reported outcomes, Degree of difficulty, OA knee, Arabic version KOOS-PS, Saudi Arabia.


Alshaymaa S Abd El-Azeim, Salah Eldin B Ahmed, Amira H Draz, Haytham M Elhafez, Omaima M Kattabei

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173934

Pages : 105-112

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ABSTRACT

Background:

This study was designed to inspect the effects of integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique (INIT) and kinesiotape (KT) on upper trapezius myofascial trigger points.

Methods:

Sixty subjects with active trigger points (53 females and seven males) were divided haphazardly into three equal groups. Group "A" received INIT three times/week while group "B" received KT twice per week for four weeks. Group "C" (control group) didn’t receive any treatment but follow instructions. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Arabic Neck disability index (ANDI) and cervical range of motion (CROM) were used to evaluate subjects at two intervals (pretreatment and post-treatment).

Results:

Statistical analysis shown that there was a significant change within-group of VAS, ANDI, side bending at both side pre-post treatment at groups A, B and C while (p<0.05). Between-group analysis there was no significant change in pre value of all variables as (p>0.05) while post-treatment there was a significant change in all variables as (p<0.05).
 

Conclusion:

INIT and KT are most effective methods in the management of subjects with active trigger points at upper trapezius myofascial trigger points with superiority for INIT.

Keywords:

integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique, kinesiotape, myofascial trigger points.


Samiah F. Alqabbani, Gurinder S. Bains, Eric G. Johnson, Everett B. Lohman, Noha S. Daher

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173936

Pages : 113-118

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Cervical spine provides three-dimensional movements of the head on the body while keeping the horizontality of visual gaze. Thus, cervical range of motion (ROM) is an important assessment that is commonly used in clinical practice. The headscarf is commonly used attire by females in Islamic cultures. The study aimed to investigate the effect of wearing headscarves on cervical ROM in females who wear headscarves compared with females who don’t wear headscarves.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was conducted on fifty-two females with mean age 28.1±3.1 years were divided into two groups: Headscarf group (n=26) and no-scarf group (n=26). Cervical Range of Motion Device was used to measure cervical spine range of motion in a seated position for flexion, extension, right lateral flexion, left lateral flexion, right rotation and left the rotation.

Results:

The headscarf group reported a significant limitation in cervical ROM in all six directions. Moreover, females in the headscarf group who wore the headscarf for more or equal to 6 hours had significantly less left rotation compared to those who wear it for less than 6 hours (71.3±2.1 vs. 64.5±2.1, η2=2.2; p=0.045). No significant differences in mean ROM by age at onset of wearing a headscarf (≤12 years vs. > 12 years) or a number of years worn (≤15 years vs. > 15 years) were detected (p>0.05).

Conclusion:

Wearing the headscarf may influence cervical ROM. Also, six hours or more of daily wear may result in further decline of cervical ROM.

Keywords:

Cervical spine, range of motion, mobility, Cervical Range of Motion Device, headscarf, and Hijab.


Mark Mendoza, Trent Jackman

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173937

Pages : 119-122

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Posterior shoulder capsulorrhaphy is a surgical procedure to help restore shoulder joint stability in patients with a history of recurrent shoulder dislocations. Physical therapy (PT) may be beneficial in outpatient rehabilitation to improve patient shoulder range of motion (ROM), muscular strength, endurance, joint stability, and return to prior level of activities after general shoulder surgery. The purpose of this case study was to describe PT intervention for a patient with shoulder posterior capsulorrhaphy in an outpatient setting.

Methods:

21-year-old male with post-surgical right shoulder posterior capsulorrhaphy due to multiple posterior
shoulder dislocation. Patient’s impairments were right shoulder weakness, decreased ROM, and functional immobility
due to pain and a retracted capsule. PT intervention was 2-3X per week for nine weeks and included therapeutic exercises,
manual therapy, modalities, and patient education for a home exercise program (HEP).

Results:

Patient was seen for 13 visits in an outpatient PT setting which improved his shoulder active ROM, strength, and outcome measures. The pain was also reduced. He returned to work with light duty restrictions after the 3rd week of PT and was able to perform normal responsibilities by the 9th week. He achieved the majority of his goals.

Conclusion:

PT intervention may have accelerated the progression of patient’s functional mobility, strength, ROM, and reduction of pain. Compared to the currently available literature for this diagnosis, the patient returned to normal function three weeks earlier than normal, probably due to earlier internal rotation exercise. Future research should include a randomized control trial regarding effective PT interventions following shoulder capsulorrhaphy surgery.

Keywords:

Physical Therapy, Capsulorrhaphy, Rehabilitation, Shoulder, Intervention, Surgery.


Anoli H. Jobalia, Supriya John

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i3/173938

Pages : 123-131

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ABSTRACT

Background:

All tasks require postural control. The appropriateness and adequacy of postural tone in the trunk muscles referred to as “Core muscles” is the key element for the control of normal postural stability in an erect position. From among the core muscles (local and global), Transversus Abdominis muscle is controlled independently of the other trunk muscles and its activation is associated with postural demand. The study aims to assess the TrA muscle endurance and Limits of Stability (Maximum Excursion-MXE and Directional Control-DC) and to determine the correlation between the two parameters.

Methods:

A Correlation study was performed on 100 asymptomatic healthy nulliparous urban women of 18-25 years’ age with Body Mass Index of 18.5- 27.9 kg/m². Participants performed two tests in random order; Prone Test for TrA muscle endurance using Pressure Biofeedback Unit and LOS Test using the NeuroCom Balance Manager®. The outcome measures were TrA endurance (Number of 10 seconds hold) and MXE (%) and DC (%) of the LOS test.

Results:

Mean (mean ± SD) values were TrA endurance: 4.93 ± 3.31, Maximum Excursion (%): 92.8 ± 7.69 and Directional Control (%): 84.53 ± 3.17. Results showed a significant positive correlation between TrA endurance and MXE whereas no significant correlation was observed between TrA endurance and DC (Pearson’s correlation test; r=0.201 and r= -0.084, respectively at p<0.05).

Conclusion:

Transversus Abdominis muscle endurance has a significant role in controlling the equilibrium (stability) component of the Postural Control but does not play a significant role in the orientation component.

Keywords:

Transversus abdominis muscle, Core muscles, Balance, Limits of stability, Muscle endurance, Pressure biofeedback unit, NeuroCom Balance Manager.