[International Journal of Physiotherapy 2018; 5(4) : 132-155] RSS

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ABSTRACT

Background: Methods: Results: Conclusion: Keywords:

Kurstein N Sant, Luke Busuttil, Aki Salo

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i4/175694

Pages : 132-140

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Scapular dyskinesis, or abnormal scapular dynamic control, is a condition which is associated with athletes presenting with shoulder pathology, although it is also found in asymptomatic individuals. Studies differ on whether it is a cause or a symptom of shoulder pain. There is currently no research on whether treating scapular dyskinesis prior to the onset of pain by prehabilitation will stop the progression of pain in asymptomatic water polo players.

Methods:

This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Twenty-five male water polo players were screened for scapular dyskinesis, and 22 players were included in the study after having a positive finding. The Closed Kinetic Chain Upper Extremity Stability Test (CCKUE), the Functional Throwing Performance Index (FTPI) and the Seated Shot Put Functional Test (SSPT) were used for functional testing, whilst power in abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation was assessed. The Sports section of the DASH score and the Constant score were used. These were obtained at the beginning of the study period. The participants were divided into two groups, the study group, and the control group. The study group underwent daily home stretches (Sleeper’s stretch and Pectorals minor stretch) and strengthening exercises (external rotation and forward flexion in a side-lying position, horizontal abduction in the prone position). Follow up with functional testing, strength testing and scores was done at four monthly intervals for one year.

Results:

The pain was reported in 3 athletes in the control group compared to 1 in the study group (p=0.59). There was a larger improvement in athletes treated with prehabilitation when assessing external rotation (p=0.01) and internal rotation (p=0.03) when compared to the control group. There was no difference between groups in functional testing, scores and abduction strength.

Conclusion:

Prehabilitation in asymptomatic water polo players does not reduce the incidence of shoulder pain. The power of external rotation and internal rotation of the dominant improved more in athletes who performed prehabilitation.

Keywords: Scapular dyskinesis, water polo, prehabilitation, shoulder pain, functional testing.

Jibi Paul, Pradeep Balakrishnan

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i4/175695

Pages : 141-144

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Neck pain is a common disorder with a reported six-month prevalence rate of 54%. Strain/counter-strain technique and stretching are passive positional intervention aimed at relieving musculoskeletal pain and related dysfunction. The study aimed to find the effect of strain counter strain technique and to stretch on tenderness over upper trapezium of neck and neck function.

Methods:

This is an experimental study with comparative pre-post study design. The subjects for the study selected from KPJ University College, Nilai, Malaysia. The study conducted in the Physiotherapy department of the University College. Total 70 with 53 female and 17 male patients were selected for this study as per sample size calculation. Thirty- five (35) samples were allocated to each group. Purposive sampling method adapted to select the samples. The study samples selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria included exhibits with a tender point over upper trapezius.
Dependant ‘t’ test was used to find the outcome of the study.

Results:

Paired t-test on the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) among stretching group found significant (P< .0001) improvement in the outcome with a mean difference of 3.23 and 12.2 respectively. A paired t-test on VAS and NDI among strain counter strain group found significant (P<.0001) improvement in the outcome with a mean difference of 3.829 and 22.686 respectively.

Conclusion:

This study concluded that both stretching and strain counter strain technique could reduce pain in the upper trapezius of the neck and improve neck function among the patients.

Keywords: Stretching, strain counter strain, neck pain, visual analogue scale, Neck Disability Index

Jeyaganesh Vellaisamy, Rajeshwari Muthusamy

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i4/175696

Pages : 145-148

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ABSTRACT

Background:

The fine motor skills and cognition will be reduced upon the aging. But, there is no clear idea of the association between the age-oriented reduction of cognition and fine motor skills. In this study trying to establish the relationship between the decline of cognition and fine motor skills in elderly individuals.

Methods:

It was an observational study performed with 45 normal elderly subjects, of which there were 23 males, 22 females, aged between 61 and 75 years. Pearson Correlation was used to find out the correlation between the data of PGI (post-graduation institute) memory scale and Purdue pegboard score, and 2-tailed t-test was used to find significant changes between data.

Results:

There is a statistically significant correlation (p = 0.000) between fine motor skills and the ten sub-test of Post-Graduation Institute (PGI) memory scale which explains that all the components are equally important in performing fine motor skills and the negative correlation between age with memory and fine motor skills. The positive correlation between PGI memory scale score and fine motor scores individually (p = 0.000).

Conclusion:

There is a positive correlation between the decline of Cognition and Fine motor skills in elderly individuals. And it proves that the changes in cognition will influence the fine motor skills.

Keywords: cognition, fine motor skills, PGI memory scale (post-graduation institute memory scale), Purdue pegboard

Amita Aggarwal, Sanika V Shete, Tushar J Palekar

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2018/v5i4/175697

Pages : 149-155

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Neck pain in forward head posture has a high prevalence. Suboccipital and SCM release technique has been reported effective in releasing shortened muscles, but no evidence is reported of its effectiveness in neck pain patients with or without forward head posture (FHP). This study is undertaken to find out if suboccipital and SCM myofascial release (MFR) have any effect in neck pain and FHP.

Methods:

Study design, A Randomized control trial 60 subjects between age 20-30 having FHP and neck pain were randomly divided into 2 groups Experimental group (n=30), control group (n=30), number of male patients (n=10) and female (n= 43), Intervention given for experimental group was MFR for suboccipital and SCM muscle and control received resisted chin tucks, Neck isometrics, Scapular sets, Hot packs, ergonomic advice (2 weeks/ 3 sessions). Outcome measures were the Craniovertebral angle (CVA), shoulder angle, NPRS, NDI, Cervical ROM assessed at baseline,
post-treatment, 3rd and 4th week follow up.

Results:

The repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant group by time interaction for changes in CVA angle (p<0.01), shoulder angle (p > 0.005), NPRS(p<0.01), NDI(p<0.01), Cervical ROM (p<0.01), in both the experimental and control group.

Conclusion:

This study concludes that Myofascial release for suboccipitals and Sternocleidomastoid is more effective than conventional therapy in improving Forward head posture and reducing neck pain.

Keywords: Myofascial release technique, neck pain, craniovertebral angle, suboccipital, Sternocleidomastoid, Thixotropy.