[International Journal of Physiotherapy 2019; 6(1) : 01-22] RSS

Index

DOI :

Pages : i-ii

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ABSTRACT

Background: Methods: Results: Conclusion: Keywords:

Fatima Anjum, Singh Sonia

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2019/v6i1/180065

Pages : 01-08

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Adherence with the treatment has been identified as an essential factor that influences the success and outcomes of treatment. Undetected nonadherence is recognized as a reason for altered treatment programs and has been suggested as a reason for nonsignificant research outcomes.

Methods:

A total of 150 subjects(urban-30 females and 47 males, rural- 36 females and 37 males)were surveyed for information using structured self-questionnairefromoutpatient physiotherapy centers, Punjabi University Patiala.

Results:

More than 95% (77 urban and 73 rural) of the elderly population. About 93.3% urban and 97.6% rural females were nonadherent whereas 91.4% urban and 100% rural males werenonadherent. Observations suggested a statistically significant relationship of barriers with adherence to physiotherapy treatment with location (p=0.0001*), physical therapy centre accessibility (p=0.0235*), difficulty travelling to physical therapy centre (p=0.0020*), paying expenses (p=0.0001*), longer treatment duration (p=0.0004*), less encouragement from family/spouse for exercise (p=0.0106*).
A non-significant relationship was found with confidence to return to exercises once stopped (p=0.0998NS), difficulty in remembering exercises (p=0.7928NS), other medical condition (OA, incontinence) (p=0.0796NS), anxiety and depression (p=0.2860NS), ability to perform ADL/IDL (p=0.0888NS).

Conclusion:

The findings indicate that a very low level of adherence was observed among the elderly population to physical therapy treatment (6.6% urban, 2.7% rural females) and (8.5% urban, 0% of rural males). Elderly residing in rural areas are comparatively less adherent than urban elderly to physiotherapy treatment.

Keywords: Adherence, geriatric, physiotherapy treatment, compliance, barriers, elderly assessment.

Shruti Bagwe, Annammma Varghese

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2019/v6i1/180067

Pages : 09-16

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ABSTRACT

Background:

An array of risk factors contributes to non-specific low back pain. Apart from age, female gender, low educational status, obesity, occupation and psychological factors, postural variations (including variations in the lower extremity) play a significant role in predisposing an individual to low back pain. Hence, while evaluating/examining a patient with back pain, the alignment of the lower extremity should be taken into consideration rather than restricting the evaluation to the lumbosacral region.

Methods:

36 subjects (12 Males, 24 Females) with non-specific low back pain were assessed for pain and disability using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The measurements for lower extremity alignment factors (Pelvic angle, Angle of torsion of the femur, Quadriceps angle, Tibial torsion and Navicular drop) were recorded bilaterally

Results:

There was a positive correlation of non-specific low back pain and disability index with the right pelvic angle (p=0.0012, r=0.51 and p=0.0003, r=0.56 respectively). Non-specific low back pain and disability index had no correlation with left pelvic angle (p=0.9101, r=0.01 and p=0.9794, r=0.00 respectively). Non-specific low back pain and disability index had a positive correlation with angle of torsion (AOT) of femur (Rt: p=0.0027, r=0.48, Lt: p=0.0084, r=0.43 and Rt: p=0.0039, r=0.46, Lt: p=0.0023, r=0.49 respectively), quadriceps angle (Q-angle) (Rt: p=0.0020, r=0.49, Lt: p=0.0014, r=0.51 and Rt: p=0.0019, r=0.49, Lt: p=0.0024, r=0.49 respectively) and navicular drop (Rt: p=<0.0001, r=0.61, Lt: p=0.0053, r=0.45 and Rt: p=0.0002, r=0.58, Lt: p=0.0048, r=0.46 respectively) bilaterally. Non-specific low back pain had no correlation with right tibial torsion (p=0.9269, r=0.01). Disability index had a positive correlation (not significant) with right tibial torsion (p=0.2427, r=0.19). There was a positive correlation (not significant) of non-specific low back pain and disability with left tibial torsion (p=0.1757, r=0.23 and p=0.0703, r=0.30 respectively).

Conclusion:

There was an association of non-specific low back pain and disability index with lower extremity alignment factors.

Keywords: Non-specific low back pain, disability, lower extremity alignment factors.

Alisha Murtaza Khokhawala, Reshma Gaurav

DOI : 10.15621/ijphy/2019/v6i1/180068

Pages : 17-22

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ABSTRACT

Background:

Mechanical low back pain is one of the most common causes of discomfort amongst people all over. There are various exercises to reduce low back pain. Swiss ball exercises are one of the dynamic exerciseswhich increase muscle strength, endurance, balance,and flexibility of the trunk while the individual leans on a swiss ball. Therefore the purpose of this study was to check the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on a swiss ball in patients with mechanical low back pain.

Methods:

Forty participants out of which 30 were females and 10 were males who were suffering from mechanical low back pain between the age group of 20 to 60 years were included. They were divided into two groups with each group having 20 subjects. One group was taught floor exercises,and the other was taught swiss ball exercises for two weeks thrice a week,i.e.,sixdays. The pain and disability were checked with the Numeric Rating Scale,and Roland Morris Questionnaire scores respectively pre and post-intervention.

Results:

On comparison of the difference between both the groups the mean difference in the NRS and RMQ scores for floor group was one ± 1 and 0.75 ± 1.6(p<0.05). The mean difference in the NRS and RMQ scores for swiss ball group was 2.6 ± 0.5 and 3.7 ± 1.26(p<0.05).

Conclusion:

We can conclude that lumbar stabilization exercises on a swiss ball are effective in reducing mechanical low back pain compared to exercises done on the static surface.

Keywords: Mechanical low back pain, swiss ball exercises, lumbar stabilization, exercises.